Taking stock of our built heritage

9 02 2018

The City of Ottawa is undertaking a major project identifying buildings, structures and other built resources of cultural heritage value. The ‘Heritage Inventory Project’ is a city-wide initiative. City staff are surveying and evaluating Ottawa’s built heritage resources, from the modest worker’s houses of Lowertown, to the fine Arts and Crafts homes in Brantwood Place, to the modernist houses of Glabar Park, and even the numerous bridges that span our city’s many waterways.

The goal of the Heritage Inventory Project is to create certainty around Ottawa’s heritage resources. Properties identified through the project will not be designated under the Ontario Heritage Act, rather they will be added to the City’s Heritage Register. A rigorous update to the City’s Heritage Register will be beneficial for property owners, developers, heritage advocates, elected officials, planning staff, community groups and all concerned residents. The research method for the project includes photographing, describing architectural characteristics and evaluating thousands of built resources throughout the city.

As we’re moving into the McKellar Park area, we’re asking readers to share information about your properties or other buildings or structures in your neighbourhood. We would love to know who designed your home or the original use of a particular building.

Please connect with the City of Ottawa’s built heritage researchers: Avery Marshall and Amber Knowles at heritageinventory@ottawa.ca or say hello if you see us in the neighbourhood.

More information about the Heritage Inventory Project is available at ottawa.ca/heritageinventory.

The City of Ottawa Heritage Inventory Project uses a GIS software tool to collect heritage data on neighbourhood buildings. Readers are invited to get in touch with the authors and share information about your house.

Photo: Courtesy of the City of Ottawa